View Poll Results: Should we follow ASCs definitions of Spyware/PUPS and add NIS to the detections?

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  • Yes, detect NIS completely!

    222 67.27%
  • Yes, but detect only some harmless files to wake up people.

    26 7.88%
  • No, please waste our donations to go through legal channels, instead of using them to fight malware.

    8 2.42%
  • None of the above.

    74 22.42%
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Thread: Either Safer Networking Ltd. or Symantec leaving the Anti Spyware Coalition...

  1. #191
    Junior Member
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    Sep 2006
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    17

    Thumbs up

    I as many of you gals and guys have try NAV and for more part I had suffer from the very same troubles you just said. I think that NAV behaive in my computer as an spyware. Based on that and the outstanding service by Spybot, I will vote for option # 1

    and Yes. I can sleep well after my choice. Let support the good work.

  2. #192
    Junior Member
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    Feb 2007
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    Default No more Norton for me

    I have been a customer of Norton for about seven years. I have bought upgrades of their Internet Security the last three years. Being about to do the same this year, I read at Amazon that Norton requested people to uninstall Spybot Search and Destroy.

    I suddendly realized that I have much more confidence on Spybot that in big Norton. There was no way I will drop Spybot just because they did not want me to keep it. After a bit of research, I ordered a different security suite.

    Thank you to all of you who make Spybot.

  3. #193
    Junior Member
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    Feb 2006
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    Default I dumped Norton

    I've used NIS for the past three years and hated the resource hog. After this fiasco with Spybot, I finally dumped the crap and went with Kaspersky. Boy! did it find stuff Norton missed. I'll never give up my Spybot . . . and one day, I will contribute.

  4. #194
    Junior Member
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    Feb 2007
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    Default

    Whenever i am asked to sort out a PC the first thing i do is remove NIS or norton antivirus.
    this product is like a virus, its difficalt to remove (almost imposible in some cases) and hogs resoures, just like malware and viruses, and it keeps wanting to contact home, another virus/malware like personality.

    I would be greatfull to see an option in spybot to remove norton antivirus completly, it would save me a considerable amount of time, and it would release at least 50% of most peoples cpu resources to do better things.

    I always then install antivir, as a virus scanner and then spybot with its registry protection/update blocker.

    In many cases the installation of spybot and antivir after removing NIS/NAV detects at least 30 bits of spyware and several viruses.

    I keep asking myself why companies like pc world and many small pc outlets keep promoting this product, but then again take a look at these companies, see a resemblance.

    regards peter

  5. #195
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    Feb 2007
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    rural NE Georgia, USA
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    Default Dump Norton hog - Avast is free

    My subscription to Norton ran out, and I read Pepi's post about Symantec's unprincipled and wrongheaded position, and together with the high price and HUGE resource requirements (my laptop is only a P-4 2.6GHz/533FSB w/512Mb - I run Linux on my production machines.. ) that substantially slowed my computer I decided to look for another anti-virus program. I discovered that Avast Anti-Virus is free for non-commercial, personal, use and includes free daily updates. I tested it, using both new and some VERY old virii and it found and dealt with them all immediately. It's simple to install and use, works good, and is free! You cannot ask for more!

    In addition, Kasperski is reasonably priced, fast, and solid with extensive technical credentials.

    My sister has been using AVG for over 3 years in her software company and is very satisfied; it is both reasonably priced, fast, and very well done (great interface, features). She swears by it.

    These are the ones I personally know about - there are several others that are reportedly just as good.

    NO anti-virus programs that I know of take such a toll on system resources and performance as the Norton/McAfee engine, or cost as much to use.

    There is just no excuse to install, or renew, Norton/McAfee when there are so many other better programs available!

    After 34 years as a Programmer, Interface Designer, and Metrologist (scientific measurement) one learns that life is too short to use expensive, sluggish, bloated software.

    Dump Norton and enjoy the added speed and lowered [or eliminated] cost! You will be glad you did.

    fudoki

  6. #196
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    Mar 2007
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    Default

    *grabs pithfork* DEATH TO SYMANTEC :D
    But seriously, symantec is just a company like AOL (charging the most for the least of service)

  7. #197
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    Mar 2007
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    Default

    Rip out Symantec like the octopus that it is. Their lousy software and renewal practices and now bad business practices have made me have it up to here with them. Any one I help out now, once Norton is up for renewal, I tell them to move on to something that won't bring their pc to it's knees.

    Spybot is a wonderful product, it has always had the same ethic, to help people who are being sabotaged by malicious software. I have been using them for years and they keep a simple and straightforward interface with constant updates.

    Keep up the good work.

  8. #198
    Senior Member nOInfectIOn's Avatar
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    Jan 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nOInfectIOn View Post
    I am really not sure of next upgrade any more.
    Hi pholX,
    following decision was/is not a "fast shot" - it took some weeks, testing lot of software: McAfee, Microsoft, ZoneAlarm, f-secure... and: G-Data [from my personal point of view: WOW - really amazing stuff (@PepiMK: Is the deep west of Germany, "wo die Sonne versinkt", the new I/O-paradise ?) !!!]...: I will not upgrade any more!

    @SB-Team: Dont leave the ASC!

    Herzliche Gre, NOInfectIOn

  9. #199
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    Mar 2007
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    Default Unfair methods by Symantec

    I think that Symantecs NIS is nowadays more often the cause of problems than the cure for them. I think having the possibility to remove NIS related products would be welcome by many, but this should be done so that you'd have to explicitly search and destroy NIS from advanced options to discourage Symantec from suing you

    Having used other antivirus softwares for years, I'd recommend avast from alwil-software, because it's free for home-users and it can scan/clean the computer during bootup while most of the viruses are eraseable.

    -----

  10. #200
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    Mar 2007
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    Default

    Forgive me if I sound like yet another echo in the hall, which I know I probably will...but there are some points where one has to call things as they see it.

    Much of my IT experience has been spent with ISPs, some of them fairly large ones. I'm currently a supervisor for one of them, so I get to deal with quite a bit in the way of customer complaints. At home I tinker quite a bit with my computer - install one program, remove another, add and remove some hardware here and there, try another OS - you name it. It's what I do, something I've done for years. I like putting these things to the test because it gives me experience with the software, and hey, part of my job occasionally sees me giving out software recommendations. Like I said, it's what I do; that's all there is to it.

    Over the years I've been doing this I've managed to give thousands - probably more, but I haven't exactly been keeping count - of customers recommendations for programs to keep their computers safe. To those of us who've been in the IT field for any length of time, most of the "recommendations" I'm giving out are old-hat common sense suggestions. Of course, the end user probably isn't all that experienced with security, and the majority of those who actually know enough to really be concerned with it usually haven't gotten there until well after the damage is done already. In any event, I dare say that fully one-third of my work winds up being proving to a customer that the reason they're not getting online is related to some sort of virus/malware/firewall issue - and remember: most of my work is at the escalation level, so that means the people the customer talks to that aren't supervisors probably see a lot more in the way of customers with this type of problem.

    Of course, once we find the problem, we make recommendations as to what a customer can do to remedy the situation. One of the programs I've always recommended just happens to be Spybot-S&D. I (rather shamefacedly, now) admit that for a while, I was also recommending - yeah, you guessed it - Symantec's products...though one thing I've always been damned careful to note (and maybe this is my saving grace point?) is that even though NAV claimed to check for spyware, customers were always better off getting another program to remove spyware, just in case something is missed. (For that reason, to this day, I still keep Ad-Aware and Spybot installed on my computer.)

    Hang on, I'm getting somewhere with this inane babbling.

    Back in '04 I had Norton Internet Security installed on my then computer (a 2.07 Athlon running Windows 2000 on 512 MB of RAM)...and man, you wanna talk about "resource hogs"...

    I swear, that was probably the most resource-hogging security application I've ever run. To date, it's also the only security software I've ever had installed on any of my computers that's actually caused me to lose internet access - I actually had to disable NIS to get online. That's bad right from the cut.

    Another thing: even then the program flagged me as a Spybot user, and of course it threw up its hands in disgust when it saw it. However, in running the two side-by-side for once, not once did Spybot ever cause a problem with Norton. Odd, no?

    I mention the installation of NIS because of a disturbing trend I've noticed through my job. That trend is that of all the times I'm likely to tell a customer to call their firewall maker due to their firewall causing an internet connection problem, NIS is the one most likely to blame (read: installed on the customer's computer) - bar none. Maybe it's a configuration problem. Maybe the customer blocked something they didn't mean to. I don't know, but you've gotta wonder...and when one considers the fact that there's gotta be someone making the same mistake with McAfee, with ZoneAlarm, or whatever other firewall you want to name, there's something that doesn't add up...and it doesn't look good for Symantec.

    I'm not necessarily posting to praise Spybot or blast Symantec. However, I've always had a grudge against larger companies (probably my own little rebellious streak manifesting), and I've always been a staunch supporter of getting the full truth out there...and seeing a big entity like Symantec beat on the little guy (no offense intended) for what basically amounts to no good reason other than turning a quick profit doesn't sit well with me - and when one considers that I had the devil's own time removing Norton from my computer, along with everything else I've mentioned, we see that not only is there a foot in the land of the dishonest, there's a chair in the land of hypocrites as well. (At least such is my opinion. Whether you decide it's fact or not is, of course, something I leave up to you.)

    With that said, I'd love nothing more than for Spybot to call NIS malware and remove it. However, that would probably give Symantec the nudge to try their hand at a defamation/libel lawsuit, and unfortunately, if they do that, they stand a damn good chance of winning. I don't think I need to say that that would potentially spell the death knell for Safer Networking. Detecting a few "harmless files" could also run into the same roadblock. That means - unfortunately for my sadistic streak - the best options of the ones Pepi is suggesting would be option three: keep it clean and do it legally. Beyond that, we all need to band together and tell people "look, there are better programs out there that will do the same job Norton does that probably cost less anyway", and thus make Symantec lose money the old-fashioned way: boycott it and give their potential earnings to the other guys. (At least most of the other ones play nice!)

    By the way, for those of us who are curious, I'm running Spybot, Ad-Aware, NOD32, and Comodo behind a Linksys router with a built-in SPI firewall.

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